One more thing on my plate – writing a regular column for Forbes

A few months ago, I was approached by Forbes.com about writing a regular column where I would share my views and opinions on technology.  Given everything on my plate, I hesitated but finally made the plunge.  Now I have one more person running my life, an editor! (Thanks Brett)   To be clear, this is separate from my “day job” so the opinions and comments I make in the column are mine and mine alone.

Forbes video

The theme of the column, which Forbes has named The Objective, is:

In the pantheon of precious resources, time is at the top of the heap. You can't create it, you can't store it and you can't delay it. It's perfectly perishable.

So why is it that when many companies invest in technology they overlook the impact on the use of time? And why aren't more purveyors of technology thinking along these lines when they are off creating the next great thing?

These are the central questions of this new column, called The Objective. It is aimed at creators and users of technology (just about everyone at this point): the former, to help them come up with the next generation of not just cool but truly useful gadgets and systems; the latter, to help them get the most out of their precious technology budgets.

The first column is up and posted on Forbes.com titled: “The Real Reason To Invest In Technology

I'm looking forward to hearing your comments/feedback along with topics/ideas you would like to see in future columns.  You can post comments here on the blog, over at forbes.com or send me an email at:    feedback (at) philmckinney (dot) com

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0 thoughts on “One more thing on my plate – writing a regular column for Forbes

  1. This article had less hokum and more practical analysis. Most people don’t realize that their technology should:

    1. Facilitate the efficient completion of one or more tasks;

    and/or

    2. Return useful and actionable information.

    If you don’t know what purpose your technology serves or if you can’t identify what information it returns that helps your organization make better decisions, then you likely don’t understand the real value of technology’s impact on your organization.

    Just my two bits.